Politics Not As Usual

“Nothing about Trumps administration is the norm, and nothing about how we respond should be the norm either. This includes the way we educate and speak to our children about the past, present and future.”

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img_1471There is so much going on in this country right now, and it’s super hard to process at times. I find myself on a daily emotional roller coaster. It’s hard to know how to focus my attention as a black woman. There are so many issues that affect and concern me simultaneously.

There are many national debates at the moment, one prevalent debate being, “Should we give Donald Trump A Chance?” This is a question I am not going to answer at the moment. I don’t feel my opinion on the matter is important. What is important however, is what informs my opinion; and I feel that is true for all of us as American Citizens.

It’s Black History Month, and while I am not a fan of the absurdity of celebrating Black History during the shortest month of the year, I think it’s pretty shady that the White house has done a piss poor job of recognizing the rich culture and contribution of African Americans to our nations’ history. To be honest, I didn’t expect much anyway, but it would have been nice to have been pleasantly surprised. Bottom line, it really isn’t the President’s responsibility to educate the public about anything. Nor is it the media’s. We operate on this false expectation that these institutions are going to follow a moral compass and do what is in the best interests of the people; historically, the men in power have always done what is best for them unless the less privileged have put up one hell of a fight.

That being said, Black people, people of color, we have a responsibility to educate our youth on our own. Our schools are not teaching them about their history. Our schools are not teaching them that their lives matter. The television they watch, the music they listen to, the images they see on social media…none of it is crafted with their empowerment in mind. We have a responsibility to take their education into our own hands and change the narrative in Trumps America.

Right now in Washington, D. C. our President is changing the way government works right before our very eyes, and the media and congress are still behaving like it is politics as usual. This is absurd. The way he came into power was unusual. Nothing about Trump’s administration is the norm, and nothing about how we respond should be the norm either. This includes the way we educate and speak to our children about the past, present and future. 

I believe it is equally as important to educate our youth about their past as is about the future of this country. There is a very nationalistic tone coming from the White House, and if it continues where does that leave people of color? If we are to educate our youth with fidelity, that means we also need to educate ourselves as adults. What does that look like, sound like, feel like? I don’t have the answers, but I would love to have the conversation. Everything feels very important right now…scarily and eerily so. These 28 days can’t just be about Rosa Parks and MLK…just saying. They are important, but it’s not enough.

If you are stuck with how to start the conversation and you happen to live in the Philadelphia area, allow me to suggest a trip to the African American Museum in Philadelphia. They have a great new exhibit, Waging Peace: 100 Years of Action. The exhibit is presented by the American Friends Service Committee and it is on display January 14-April 23rd. It’s a great way to start conversations about immigration, prison reform, just economics, ending discrimination, building peace, and how to engage in justice work.

Teachers, take your students. Parents, take your children. Adults, take your friends or a stranger. Just have a conversation. Spread the word. Share some information. Engage in debate and live the discourse. We have to change the narrative that surrounds us.

Julia

Enjoy some pics from our visit to the exhibit!